The act of utilitarianism

The categorical imperative looks for a logical contradiction in a rule, it looks at the consequences of that rule when applied universally to see if a contradiction occurs and if so it cannot be a moral law.

The act of utilitarianism

Act Utilitarianism Utilitarianism is a consequentialist ethical theory.

The act of utilitarianism

An action is right or wrong based on its consequences. John Stuart Mill was an important philosopher in developing the idea of utilitarianism. Utilitarianism holds that any action that results in a greater amount of happiness in the world is a right action and any action that results in pain or less happiness is wrong.

Utilitarianism can be divided into different versions. Act utilitarianism is one of the versions of utilitarianism. Act utilitarianisms goal is to maximize the overall happiness of the universe. Act utilitarianism uses the Greatest Happiness Principle which says in every situation, choose the option that you believe to be most likely to produce the greatest possible happiness or least possible unhappiness for the all people who will be affected.

An act utilitarian would determine if robbing a bank is a right action or not by determining how much happiness the robbery would create. To do this he would have to use the hedonistic calculus, which is a way of adding up all the happiness that everyone affected by an action would receive.

If the results of this calculation show that the bank managers, the hundreds of investors, and the police would all be unhappy with this action and only the robber and maybe his family would be happy, then robbing the bank is a wrong action. If the bank managers did not care about the customers money, the FDIC insured all the stolen money, the police were not unhappy because of the robbery, and the robber was extremely happy because he could move to the Caribbean and never work again, then robbing the bank would be a right action.

There are many good points to act utilitarianism. It is very appealing because most people want to increase their happiness and reduce their pain. Act utilitarianism says that people could do that and they would not only make everyone happier but they would also be doing what is morally right."Instead of looking at the consequences of a particular act, rule-utilitarianism determines the rightness of an act by a different method.

First, the best rule of conduct is found. This is done by finding the value of the consequences of following a particular initiativeblog.com rule the following of which has the best overall consequences is the best rule. Utilitarianism is an ethical theory that states that the best action is the one that maximizes utility, which is usually defined as that which produces the greatest well-being of the greatest number of people, and in some cases, sentient animals.

Jeremy Bentham, the founder of utilitarianism, described utility as the sum of all pleasure that results from an action, minus the suffering of. Act Utilitarianism is also much more flexible as it allows the principle of utility to be applied relatively to a situation, in comparison to Rule Utilitarianism, which if you are a strong follower, has established rules that cannot be adjusted or disobeyed depending on the situation.

This kind of utilitarianism is called “ act utilitarianism,” because it evaluates actions one at a time, saying that an action is good if it produces the greatest happiness for the greatest number, and bad if it produces unhappiness.

Act utilitarianism uses the Greatest Happiness Principle which says in every situation, choose the option that you believe to be most likely to produce the greatest possible happiness or least possible unhappiness for the all people who will be affected.

An act utilitarian would determine if robbing a bank is a right action or not by. "According to act-utilitarianism, it is the value of the consequences of the particular act that counts when determining whether the act is right.

The act of utilitarianism

Bentham 's theory is act-utilitarian, and so is that of J.J.C. Smart.

Utilitarianism, Act and Rule | Internet Encyclopedia of Philosophy